Don't Know Much

Who Said It? (2/7/2013)

I hope it will not be conceived from these observations, that it is my wish to hold the unhappy people . . . in slavery.

George Washington in a letter to Robert Morris, April 12, 1786.

 

I hope it will not be conceived from these observations, that it is my wish to hold the unhappy people who are the subject of this letter, in slavery. I can only say that there is not a man living who wishes more sincerely than I do, to see a plan adopted for the abolition of it—but there is only one proper and effectual mode by which it can be accomplished, & that is by Legislative authority: and this, as far as my suffrage will go, shall never be wanting.

Source: The Founders Archives

Posted on February 7, 2023

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