Don't Know Much

Remembering the Nuremberg Trials: A Don’t Know Much About® Audiominute

As the world prepares to mark “International Holocaust Remembrance Day” on January 27, it is a reminder that the date marks the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau camps by Soviet forces. And that is another grim reminder of what the Nuremberg Trials were about.

The Nuremberg Trials — A Don’t Know Much About® Audiominute

75 years ago on November 20, 1945, in the aftermath of World War II, the first trials of Nazi war criminals began. This military tribunal, the Nuremberg Trials, as they came to be known, was convened by the four victorious Allies—Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States.

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Defendants in the Dock at the Nuremberg Trials (Image: National Archives)

That four great nations, flushed with victory and stung with injury stay the hand of vengeance and voluntarily submit their captive enemies to the judgment of the law is one of the most significant tributes that Power has ever paid to Reason.

What makes this inquest significant is that these prisoners represent sinister influences that will lurk in the world long after their bodies have returned to dust. We will show them to be living symbols of racial hatreds, of terrorism and violence, and of the arrogance and cruelty of power.

-United States Prosecutor Robert Jackson, Opening Statement (11/22/1945)

Read Robert Jackson’s full opening statement here

This is a timeline of the Nuremberg Trials from the Robert H. Jackson Center.

These resources on the Nuremberg Trials are from the Library of Congress.

This is an article about the Nuremberg Trials I wrote in 2005 for the Rutland (VT) Herald.

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