Don't Know Much

Don’t Know Much About Minute: More Pilgrims 101

Share:

When Abraham Lincoln signed a Thanksgiving Proclamation in 1863 calling for a day of gratitude on the last Thursday in November, it began an unbroken string of presidential Thanksgiving Proclamations. In 1941, the FOURTH Thursday in November was set as a national holiday by Congress and signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt.

In my previous video and quiz about Thanksgiving, I told you that there were no black hats with buckles, half of the “pilgrims” weren’t Pilgrims and that the first Thanksgiving was really  in October. Here are a few more pieces of the picture.

And here is a link to a story I wrote for the New York Times about America’s real first Pilgrims, a group of French settlers in Florida who arrived 50 years before the Mayflower sailed.

A day of “Thanksgiving” was officially proclaimed by Abraham Lincoln in 1863, in the midst of the Civil War. It was the beginning of an unbroken string of Thanksgiving proclamation by American presidents. The last Thursday in November became an official national holiday in 1941, signed into law by Franklin D. Roosevelt.

THE PLIMOTH PLANTATION historical site also offers a good overview of the Pilgrim story:

The Latest From My Blog

Don’t Know Much About® the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire

On this date, March 25, 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York caught fire and 146 people died, most of…

Read More

On this Date-Manzanar Internment Camp Opens

On March  23, 1942, the first Japanese-Americans evacuated by the U.S. Army during World War II arrived at the internment…

Read More